Paul Kwon

Associate Professor

 

Office:  Johnson Tower 214

P.O. Box 644820

Department of Psychology

Washington State University

Pullman, WA  99164-4820

Phone:  (509) 335-4633

FAX:  (509) 335-5043

E-mail:  kwonp@wsu.eduDescription: Description: C:\Web page\mail12an.gif

 

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Educational background 

Ph.D. (1996) Pennsylvania State University 
M.S. (1993) Pennsylvania State University 
   Major: Clinical psychology 
   Minor: Social psychology 
B.A. (1990) Williams College

 



Research interests

Broadly speaking, my major research interest is in examining how people cope with stress in their lives, addressing the question of why some people are able to adapt to difficult situations more easily than others. I am particularly interested in examining how resilience variables, such as hope, can influence how individuals from stigmatized groups (such as sexual minorities and ethnic minorities) cope with environmental stressors. I recently developed a theoretical framework for resilience in lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals (Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2013 - see publications list).

I have also investigated vulnerability factors to depression from an integrative perspective, combining cognitive and psychodynamic perspectives in a logical, theoretically-based manner.  My work has shown that the relationship between cognitive vulnerability factors (e.g., negative attributional style, lack of hope) and depression is moderated by psychodynamic defense mechanisms. In general, I am interested in refining our understanding of how variables such as hope, rumination, perfectionism, attributional style, and defense mechanisms are moderated or mediated by one another.

Publications list

    If you are a WSU undergraduate interested in working in my research lab, please contact me to set up an appointment.



Clinical interests

  • Integrative psychotherapy (emotion-focused, cognitive-interpersonal, and psychodynamic perspectives), with an emphasis on empirically-supported interventions